And quiet flows the Han river

Andrei Lankov
This is a blog about the past, about the history and sometimes the present day interactions between the Russians and the Koreans. In most cases, but by no means always, political issues are studiously avoided by the author, whose major interest is everyday life, culture and the lives of individuals. In this blog, we will explore how Russian culture was (and is) seen in Korea, we will talk about migration, mixed marriage and even cuisine. So to put it simply, the blog is about how these two countries have interacted over the last 200-odd years. Andrei Lankov, born in 1963, is a historian of Korea. He wrote his PhD on the early modern Korea, but in recent years his work deals mainly with the history of North Korea. He is also known for his journalistic writings on Korean history in general, especially Korean history after 1500, and the dawn of modern Korea. He has published a number of books (four in English) on Korean history. Having taught Korean history at the Australian National University, he now teaches in Kookmin University in Seoul.
The adventures of Russian tiger hunters in the wilderness of Korea

The adventures of Russian tiger hunters in the wilderness of Korea

September 16, 2013 Andrei Lankov, special to RBTH Asia Pacific

In 1922, a flotilla arrived in the port city of Chongjin which is now part of present-day North Korea. It consisted of a few barges and tugs loaded with all kinds of agricultural and hunting equipment. The flotilla brought with it the Yankovsky family which soon became the most successful and influential of all Russian emigrate families in colonial Korea.

How Comrade Mao was perceived in the Soviet Union

How Comrade Mao was perceived in the Soviet Union

September 3, 2013 Andrei Lankov, special to RBTH Asia Pacific

Back in the late 1960s, Mao was quite popular among Western progressive intellectuals – many of whom, like Jean Paul Sartre, switched to Mao the admiration they once felt toward Stalin. The Cultural Revolution was then seen as a bold social experiment to be studied – and perhaps even - emulated in Paris and Bonn.

How Soviets changed their attitude towards South Korea

How Soviets changed their attitude towards South Korea

August 16, 2013 Andrei Lankov, RBTH Asia Pacific

Until the 1980s South Korea did not feature prominently in the Soviet world view. The average Soviet citizen imagined South Korea as a run-of-the-mill underdeveloped military dictatorship with some Asian specifics. The dramatic discovery of South Korea had to wait until the early days of Perestroika – and this discovery was dramatic indeed.

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